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for civil rights. "america's unwritten constitution" he's professor of law at the yale law school. president for the alliance of justice system. it is wonderful to have you here. this week, we have two blockbuster political events on the calendar. the first presidential debate and the return of the supreme court to washington. they will hear arguments since the first time on the affordable care act. a start and fresh reminder of the power of the court. the court returns with a docket packed with high profile cases and others likely to be heard. it's strangely almost entirely absent from the presidential campaign. it becomes alarming when you look at the age of the justices. 76, 76, 74, and the oldest is 79 years old. let's not forget she's the fifth vote to uphold a decision in roe v. wade. >> i hope to appoint justices to the supreme court that will follow the law and the constitution. it will be my impression they will reverse row v. wade. >> it's very likely the next president of the united states will appoint several justices to the supreme court. that often is the most lasting legacy of
they are at a disadvantage, i completely agree with kleiza rice that the civil rights issue of our day is school choice and the disaster of the public schools, it is a universal law of nature that everything run by the government will become worse and more expensive over time. everything that is sold on the private market will become better and less expensive over time. like flat screen tv's, cell phones. versus the post office, public schools, and amtrak food service. and by the way, our entire health care is now going to be put in the hands -- in the capable hands of the federal government. >> one more school thing. also from "the new york times." >> i disagree. >> you may not. four decades after clashes, bottom of the again debates school busing. nearly four decades after the city was convulsed by violence over court-ordered segregation, boston is working to reduce its reliance on busing at a school system now made up of largely minority students. although court-ordered busing ended more than two decades ago, only 13% of students in boston, 13% in the public schools, today are white. and the school
on civil rights grounds because he was not on abortion. it has nothing to do with black people anymore. who was i talking about? host: charles pickering. guest: he was a prosecutor prosecuting the klan. he was putting his life at jeopardy and sent his kids to public schools. not white liberals. host: this is missy in buffalo. good morning. caller: i think you're brilliant. you are my role model. i just wanted to say that and i can wait to read your book. i know your book covers the 1970's and 1980's. the one topic they bring up with republicans is slavery. the republicans had a huge role in ending slavery, they still use that as a talking point against our party. guest: and the apocryphal southern strategy. that is the most amazing rewrite in history. in my third book, a large part of that was telling the truth of joe mccarthy. that covered about five years. liberals have reread the history to cover 200 years. republicans or the party to talk about slavery. it was for the next 100 years with platforms endorsing justice marshall -- attorney 30 marshall's -- ternate thurgood marshall -- attor
win and my retort is if you look back over the years, from women's suffrage, civil rights, to more recently the alternative ener movement, have been borne from third parties garn hing enough votes away from the two major political parties so engrained in the status quo that they never impose the sweeping changes so i hope you can comment on the role of third parties not necessarily in winning elections but in changing the agenda to the point where we get the changes we end up treasuring over the next century. host: thank you for the call. dr. jill stein. guest: thank you for making that point, which is very important. in fact, what so many people call progress in this country, whether you talk about women getting the right to vote, the abbitionist slavery, the protection of workers in the workplace, the right to organize, the 40 hour work week, child labor laws, social social security, the new deal, you name it, all of these have come out of independent third parties, because as you say, the party that is are bought and paid for by large corporations which are part of the status qu
the alien torched statute. -- alien tort statute. any civil action by agent alien's right toward the only committed and a violation of the law of nations or a treaty of the united states, this is an old statute enacted by the first congress which sat dormant for 170 years. then some civil-rights folks pick them up and they started bringing cases in which the plaintiff is foreign, the defendant is foreign, and report to a place in some foreign place. they come into in new york federal court and say you have jurisdiction over this and courts have been allowing some of these cases to go forward, strange as it sounds. this case raised the question -- this takes place in nigeria and the guy says he mistreated me, tortured me and so forth. these foreign oil companies were composite and help the nigerian company do this to me -- these companies work implicit. you can actually sue incorporation under this statute and that was their claim last year. the u.s. supreme court heard arguments in the case and did something very unusual -- they actually said to the parties we want to consider a broader q
. contrast that with a judge that was blocked by the democrats on civil rights grounds because he was not on abortion. it has nothing to do with black people anymore. who was i talking about? host: charles pickering. guest: he was a prosecutor prosecuting the klan. he was putting his life at jeopardy and sent his kids to public schools. not white liberals. host: this is missy in buffalo. good morning. caller: i think you're brilliant. you are my role model. i just wanted to say that and i can wait to read your book. i know your book covers the 1970's and 1980's. the one topic they bring up with republicans is slavery. the republicans had a huge role in ending slavery, they still use that as a talking point against our party. guest: and the apocryphal southern strategy. that is the most amazing rewrite in history. in my third book, a large part of that was telling the truth of joe mccarthy. that covered about five years. liberals have reread the history to cover 200 years. republicans or the party to talk about slavery. it was for the next 100 years with platforms endorsing justice
to get ahead of things, the plaintiffs here are attorneys, civil rights activists and others who are in regular contact with people overseas particularly people who might well be the subject of electronic surveillance by the federal government and they are challenging the law that allows electronic surveillance, this wiretapping because they're concerned that their case will be picked up. they're claiming to have standing to challenge this law because even though the surveillance might be directed overseas to people they're talking to get their dedication will get picked up in the course of that surveillance and so therefore they have the right to challenge it in court. that is the standing issue we we are dealing with. just to get to the merits for a minute, and the aftermath of the exposÉ in the mid-70's about various abuses in the intelligence community and in short in short is set up a system by which the executive branch would have to go to the court surveillance court here in d.c. and get permission when they wanted to do wiretapping for national security purpose to give s
presidents do. on civil rights, especially, there was a lot of movement from 1962, when the tapes start to 1963. it was all changing. the white house had swung very much behind the civil rights movement in the fall of 1963. >> he was very involved in the minut minutia, like our other boss, president clinton. >> exactly. incredible moment in august 28th, 1963, the great martin luther king speech "i have a dream" had just happened and they had a political strategy session where president kennedy went through all the members of the house and senate and what he thought their likelihood was to support civil rights. it was clear, he was on their side, driving it forward. >> there's a little clip that exposes a personal side of the president as well. let's play that. >> i wanted to do back to jordan marsh. >> all right, sir. i want that follow's incompetent who had his picture taken in next to mrs. kennedy's bed. he is a silly bastard. i wouldn't have him running a cat house. >> he is furious over a $5,000 bill for a hospital room, right? sn>> a timely expenditure built for a legitimate reason
line higher education, business officials, civil rights groups that allied support for the use of race and the university of texas, swamp the number of briefs that are in opposition, but if you look at the broader public opinion, it appears that only about one-quarter of the u.s. population supports the idea of racial preferences in college admissions. by contrast, you will see in the second set of figures, the blues set of figures, there is quite broad support among the very same set of voters for preferences in college admissions based upon income. now, given these it is not surprising that we -- lord -- ward connerly has been extremely successful in his effort to ban affirmative action based upon race in a number of states. so far, those efforts are five other six times voters, when given the option has said we should end racial consideration in college admissions and public employment. including blues states. the second major problem facing affirmative-action is the legal issue by -- which will be joined in the fisher case. many people expect the u.s. supreme court is going to occu
laws because it opens businesses up to frivolous lawsuits, because we already have civil rights legislation to take care of anti-discrimination law. they don't usually come out and say it's about freedom, it's a business's right to pay women less for equal work. romney may not support todd akin but we should ask him hough he feels about this legislation that todd akin, if he's elected, will be voting on. >> this is one race the republicans early on are expected to win. john cornyn saying he doesn't think it's winnable. can akin win this race? >> i think it's possible. missouri is one of the only swing states that mccain still polled out last time when he lost ohio and other places. there's been a lot of improvement in the polls but neither candidate has ever moved very far past 50%. so that tells you that even with everything jamming up the system, this is a close race. >> but he apologized once for his remark about women, legitimate rape. and now he has come out of -- saying employers shouldn't have to pay women the same money in the workplace. >> so often the defense is -- we
states and this showdown in michigan to the civil rights movement. she says she is doing everything she can to get people to support prop 2. >> hey, are you a registered voter? do you know about this initiative? do you have a car? do you need a ride to the polls? i'm just excited because this is like that american fight, like they were fighting in the '60s. >> reporter: terry bowman is just as passionate. he's worked for ford at this parts plant outside detroit for 16 years. he's a member of the united auto workers union, but he thinks giving unions more power by changing the state constitution is a bad idea. especially in a state with high unemployment that's trying to attract newbusinesses. >> no corporation's going to want to come to michigan. it's going to guarantee an adverse aerial relationship right from the minute they come into the state. >> vote yes. >> reporter: both sides are getting support from outside the state, flooding the airways with commercials. >> don't let them hijack our constitution. >> reporter: dawson bell has been covering michigan politics for the "detroit fr
with the civil-rights of the 1960's. host: john from illinois. john is an independent. hey there. caller: the only problem that i have is about the tax issue. the reason why i say that is our taxes in this country have neverwhat they were set up for was that the rich were supposed to pay the majority of their taxes in federal taxes. working-class and the port were supposed to pay the majority of theirs in homeowners' taxes, city and state taxes -- ordering class and the poor. everything is out of sorts. when you are on fixed income and these states will have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government will have such a lower one. anybody i fixed tax rate goes in and buys a refrigerator that costs $400, will have about a $100 tax on the refrigerator. that is the problem. the ones it will hurt our people that are retired, people that are on disability, things like that. otherwise, i am completely in line with you. i voted for ron paul in 1988. i voted for paul brown. i think he -- i can remember what year it was that he ran as a libertarian. i voted for ross perot once. i am
with civil rights of the '60s. >> host: john is from illinois now. john is an independent. hi there. >> caller: hi. mr. johnson, the only problem i have is about the tax issue. and the reason why it's like -- the reason why i say that is, our taxes in this country have never been set at actually to be fair. what they were set up for originally was that the rich were supposed to pay the majority of their taxes in federal taxes, and the working class and the poor were supposed to pay most of -- the majority of theirs in home owners taxes, city and state taxes. and that has been all -- it's got everything out of sorts. my problem with what everybody calls a fair tax is, when you're on a fixed income, and these states are going to have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government is going to have such a lower one, that when anybody that is on a fixed tax rate goes in and buys a refrigerator, they cost $400, the lowest one they can buy, they have about $100 tax on the refrigerator. that is the problem. and the only ones it's going to hurt is people that are retired, people
these cases can be so big they can be exported. civil-rights concerned about cutting back on class-action. too expensive to litigate each case one by one. the justices in the comcast case will consider the question of how much judges should decide about the case before certifying and saying everyone can be in all the lawsuits together. do they have to figure route if all these people and have one theory of damages or have to look at whether there was a fraud or securities fraud case so there will be more in line of the wal-mart decision about class-action procedure? two tiny actions. people in college try to get text books that are not incredibly expensive. the supreme court has a copyright case about what happens with market goods. text books made overseas when sold at a lower price are imported to the united states. producer of that book or any other copyrighted material have a right to limit it coming into the united states and actually a body on the questions of when a lawsuit is moved. a very lawyer the the the the issue but those who are interested and are practicing lawyers there are fi
and having been in charlotte, a great civil-rights city, where the students from the historical black college in 1960 set up a lunch counter in to grant them and yet, what do we see today? state after state, efforts to suppress voting rights instead of expanding them. not enough people vote in this country. in pennsylvania, there is legislation now on the books that could disenfranchise between 750,000-1 million people. president obama won by 600,000 boats in pennsylvania last time. this really does determine the election. i don't care who you are for. this will determine the election. it is a huge problem or the country. we should be celebrating voters going to the polls, not putting impediments in their way. host: the radio program " democracy now" turns 25 this year? guest: we started in 1996. we were just on radio. the week of september 11, 2001, we started on the first television station in new york city on public access. then it just caught on like wildfire. beyond the election and more television stations aired us and radio stations and npr stations and pbs stations all over the countr
impact especially on civil rights cases. and i think it's entirely poible the court may limit or even overrule justice o'connor's opinion getting rid of racial preferences more and more. >> so this is a case involving a state university, aic university. so if they decide that affirmative action giving a preference to certain students based on race for example is unconstitutional, would it also automatically apply to private universities that get federal aid, for example? >> not automatically. but this is the way the court works is that they decide one case at a time. and they establish principles that are later applied or not applied. each case can be somewhat diffent. but if t say that a university which is a part of the state may not consider race, that race is simply impermissib impermissible, you can be sure that that message will filter out not just through universities but also to employers and to the government. it could be an enormous change. we'll only deal with public universities this term. >> let me read to you from your column you wrote on cnn.com. very provocative but im
is cnn's deborah feyerick. >> reporter: it is a scene that played out in states across the country. civil rights groups pushing back against voter i.d. laws enacted by republican controlled legislatures since 2010. >> the effort to change the rules of the game at the last minute is a really misguided effort. >> reporter: wendy wiser is with the brandon center for justice and warns hundreds of thousands of voters may not have necessary i.d. they include the elderly, college students, poor people, blacks and latinos, groups that traditionally vote democratic. >> we need to do everything we can to ensure that there is no fraud in our elections, but what we shouldn't be doing is passing unnecessary laws that needlessly exclude thousands or hundreds of thousands of eligible americans from participating equally in our democracy. >> reporter: the new voter i.d. laws protect only against voter impersonation. in pennsylvania, a traditional swing state, lawyers for both sides admit no known cases of in person fraud. still, it is a problem says conservative columnist john fund, an expert on the subj
? >> wow. >> before the civil rights act was passed was the last time we had a president from massachusetts win ask i'm not saying mitt romney is a bad guy. i'm sure he's a nice guy, but i will say that if i was going to write a movie and create a bad guy orvilleen, i would have them be a really, really wealthy out of touch guy who stashes his money in cayman bank accounts and fires people for a living. >> you know, because he likes to fire people. >> he likes being able to fire people. >> and get him -- get him a car garage for his vacation home. >> car elevator. >> elevator, yes car elevator. there are so many things about mitt romney. we could go on and on. i'm sure i's a very nice man has a good family. i saw his sons out in iowa. there's something that disturbs me about the way mitt romney is running for president. it's almost like he wants to go back in time. i saw him and he would talk about how great america was and barack obama wants to change america to make it great. i want to go back to what made america great in the past. it's like he wants to go back to some time period when h
to end the civil rights investigation. the board says african-american students receive an unfair majority of suspensions. the board has a plan in place to make sure students are treated equally. >>> a mother ran away leaving her daughter behind at the safeway to deal with police. the girl is staying with her grandmother. >>> nobel peace laureate ang sang su kyi will visit the area. she will speak at a sold out event tomorrow. we will have a look at the forecast and the morning commute when we come back. >>> welcome back. taking a live look at san francisco. i want to step out of the way so you see how foggy it is. that is the natural coolant off the pacific. we will soar into the weekend. a dangerous heat wave. if you work outdoors and you are caught off guard, you want to stay hydrated. it is not too bad right now. 61 in livermore. sunny finish for today. warmer than acknowledge conditions. heat wave sunday through tuesday. toward the end of next week, cooler weather arrives. we have to get through this, saturday through tuesday, triple digit heat. stay cool out there. let's che
.s. citizen, i have a long and proud history of peaceful civil disobedience to draw on when facing injustice like racism or any other kind of movements throughout this country's history in which civil disobedience has been used, such as the women's rights movement or in the protest in the war in vietnam. >> this took place when the united nations general assembly was in town. here you are asking police what you're being arrested for. what were you charged with? >> eventually -- i wasn't told on the spot. i was neither read my rights nor was i told what i was being arrested for. but later at one of the precincts where i was held, and before i was taken to central booking, i was told i was charged with criminal mischief, making graffiti and possessing a graffiti instrument. i was after 22 hours arraigned before a judge and i'm supposed to return in november to see whether i will be put on trial on these charges or not. >> do you think that spray painting this particular ad was a form of peaceful disobedience? was that what you were trying to sort of -- the message you were trying to send? >> m
. >> paul steinhauser, good to see you. thanks so much from washington. >> thank you. >>> all right, as world leaders gather in new york, trying to figure out how to end syria's civil war, the numbers coming out of the country show the crisis is getting far worse. youtube video showing just how risky walking in syria's biggest sy of aleppo it be. 122 people have been killed so far today. the death toll since march, 2011, 30,000. that figure from a syrian human rights group. and now the united nations is releasing this figure. 700,000. that's the number of refugees predicted to flow into other countries. the u.n.'s refugee agency is asking for more than $480 million in aid. as ts is happing, u.s. defense secretary leon panetta said today that u.s. intelligence has detected syria moving chemical weapons at some sites for security reasons. a detail that could influence a decision about u.s. military intervention in syria. remember, this is what president obama said about chemical weapons in syria just last month. >> a red line for us is we start saying a whole bunch of chemical weapons
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)

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